My take on housing woes

October 17th, 2013 by poobalan | View blog reactions Leave a reply »
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This is some sort of a record. My last posting was on 30th August! Plenty of things I want to write about, but lack time for proper research and writing. End up tweeting those issues I wanted to blog about.

Anyway, I was responding to a posting in FB which stated “So HK and singapore house prices to come down by 20%. Malaysia how?”  and thought why not collect those responses and blog it. Basically, what I think should be done to curb prices. Apologies for the informal language.

in my taman which is abt 13 yrs old, the new phase being constructed which is 2.5 storey is frm 800k to 2.2mil. The land was bought so long ago. Building material n construction quality is average even though this company is top 20 in malaysia. First phase years ago was 140k. So what justifies the price? Labor? Material? Advertising? Value added stuff?

Govt is being too soft. Should review pricing structure. If developers threaten no prob, can take over projects. Deny license for houses that are too big. Why need 24*80 3 storey house when most families are getting smaller? Just for once in a while relatives visit? 20*70 or 22*75 is ok already.

Labors are moved around from project to project as well. Cost is the spread among projects.

House price should be on land purchase price, not land current price.

Limit an individual to own 3 house max.

Foreigners limit to 10% of any house project and house price min 1mil.

House below 5 yrs not allowed to be sold unless owner pass away or migrate or ill etc.

Stop building houses in hard to reach places for low income group. They r the ones who need public transport. Let bungalows or high condo be built in outskirts.

Houses in city area must not be cost more than affordable monthly repayment amount of 1/3 of salary of average msian.

 

Yes, construction and housing is one of the backbone of country development. But if things that are being developed is of little benefit, then no point developing them. We can’t wait for the “trickle down” effect to benefit the rest.

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