School to make way for cemetery

November 20th, 2007 by poobalan | View blog reactions Leave a reply »
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" According to Thiakarajan, not many people are aware that the developments in the area would take place right in the middle of a modern township surrounded by the Alam Sutra bungalow lots developed by SPPK, Bukit OUG, OUG Heights, Mutiara Bukit Jalil and Bandar Bukit Jalil."

smart move. when poor people complain about cemetary, nothing will happen. but when gated community and bungalow residents complain, top guns will turun padang 🙂

By CHARLES FERNANDEZ

source

charlesf@thestar.com.my 

THERE seems to be no end to their problems. First, they were ordered to vacate their houses to make way for some development projects. Now, their 80-year-old school will be relocated to make way for a cemetery and a crematorium. 

The 58 families of the former Bukit Jalil estate in Jalan Puchong, Kuala Lumpur, were served eviction notices by the Kuala Lumpur City Hall (DBKL) a few months ago as they were classified as squatters.  

Now SJK (T) Ladang Bukit Jalil would have to be relocated. Although the new site is not far from the present location, the residents are worried that only a perimeter wall would separate them from the cemetery and the crematorium. 

According to Bukit Jalil residents action committee spokesman Thiakarajan Sathasivam, 53, the area allocated for the new school is only 40,000 sq ft without any space for basic educational amenities. 

Grave issue: The Bukit Jalil residents action committee is against having a cemetery and crematorium right in their midst in the middle of the modern township.

Thiakarajan said the residents were appealing for a bigger piece of land for the school as they were anticipating an increase in the student population once the neighbouring Program Perumahan Rakyat (PPR) flats in Kampung Mu- hibbah were fully occupied within the next two years. 

Thiakarajan said that at present, the school had 104 students and, since only four of the 10 PPR flats had been occupied, a bigger student population could be expected once all the blocks were occupied. 

He said another major concern was the proximity of the cemetery and crematorium to the new school site. 

An area surrounded with graves, he pointed out, was not a very conducive environment for the pupils as they would feel uneasy and might even be emotionally disturbed. 

“Once the crematorium is operational, the school, PPR flats and the surrounding areas will be affected by the smoke and the noise during funeral ritual services,” he said. 

According to Thiakarajan, not many people are aware that the developments in the area would take place right in the middle of a modern township surrounded by the Alam Sutra bungalow lots developed by SPPK, Bukit OUG, OUG Heights, Mutiara Bukit Jalil and Bandar Bukit Jalil. 

“We have already voiced out our displeasure on this matter to Bandar Tun Razak MP Datuk Tan Chai Ho and the MIC as most of the affected residents are Indians,” Thiakarajan said. 

The residents also feel that it is wrong of the DBKL to ignore their rights as long-established settlers of the land and to act without consideration of their plight. They insist that they are not illegal occupants of the land although it had been sold. 

Originally there were more than 100 families. They had worked in the estate even before the nation gained independence. Some had left following the takeover of the land by the Federal Government for the Commonwealth Games in 1998. 

The estate ceased operations in 1994 and the remaining families were issued several eviction notices. The remaining 58 families have refused to move because they did not like the DBKL classifying them as squatters. 

The DBKL had offered them three-room low-cost units at the PPR flats but they did not turn up for the drawing of lots on Oct 1. 

According to Thiakarajan, the 58 affected families had submitted a memorandum to the Prime Minister’s Department last week, and are waiting for a response. 

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