DAP and PAS at it again

August 23rd, 2010 by poobalan | View blog reactions Leave a reply »
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Its quite evident that the two parties won’t be able to find a common ground, that’s why the contentious issues on religion has not been properly articulated earlier. This will be one of the factors that will lead to downfall of the Pakatan coalition. It just doesn’t jive to imagine DAP and PAS sharing a common consensus on the state of our state.

So, its not surprising to read again about DAP “distancing” itself or PAS saying “DAP are not clear yet” or “just view of individual”. Its quite clear to me (and probably to others as well). From early of last year (read it here and here) till end of last year (read it here), the hudud and Islamic state has been simmering. And it won’t be the last we hear of this issue.

The DAP today distanced itself from renewed talk of hudud law and the implementation of an Islamic state, saying that these were not Pakatan Rakyat (PR) policies.

DAP advisor Lim Kit Siang maintained that DAP’s stand on Malaysia as a secular state has always been “constant and consistent.”

“Hudud laws and [an] Islamic state are not Pakatan Rakyat policies. This is why there is no mention of these issues in the Pakatan Rakyat common platform unveiled at the Pakatan Rakyat convention in Shah Alam on December 19 last year,” said Lim in a statement today.

Under the PR Common Policy Framework (CPC) last year, PR had made a pledge to “defend the Federal Constitution, Islam as the religion of the Federation while other religions can be practiced peacefully anywhere in the country…”

Reiterating that the two matters were not part of the PR framework, Lim said “any policy change would need the agreement of all three component parties and there is no such consensus in Pakatan Rakyat on hudud laws and Islamic state.”

The Ipoh Timur MP then pointed out that the idea of an Islamic state was supported and advocated by the three most recent prime ministers — Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamed, Tun Abdullah Ahmad Badawi and Datuk Seri Najib Razak.

Lim claimed that this contradicted the positions of the first three prime ministers — Tunku Abdul Rahman, Tun Abdul Razak and Tun Hussein Onn — who considered Malaysia a secular nation and not an Islamic state.

“It is the leaderships of the  MCA, Gerakan, MIC, SUPP and the other Barisan Nasional (BN) component parties who were ever-ready to give unquestioned support to the declarations by the last three prime ministers, beginning with Mahathir’s ‘929 Declaration’ that Malaysia is an Islamic state on September 29, 2001, who should be repudiating their past positions instead of trying to pull the wool over the people’s eyes,” added Lim.

Renewed talks regarding the implementation of hudud laws and an Islamic state started when DAP national chairman Karpal Singh stated that he was firmly opposed to such laws being implemented should PR take over the federal government.

Karpal had argued that such laws were “unconstitutional” and that everyone had to respect the constitution.

PAS spiritual advisor Datuk Nik Abdul Aziz Nik Mat claimed that Karpal was the only DAP leader raising the issue, adding that other leaders were silent on the matter.

Nik Aziz said that Karpal’s views did not represent the views of DAP.

In the 1999 general election, the DAP together with PAS and PKR formed the Barisan Alternatif coalition, which collapsed after two years when DAP quit due to PAS’ objective of forming an Islamic state.

The unprecedented co-operation between DAP and PAS then resulted in the defeat of DAP’s strongmen Lim Kit Siang and Karpal Singh in Penang due to non-Muslim voters’ fear of the Islamic party.

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